Info Hub

Here you will find all the technical information regarding our product range!

Oops ! You forgot to select a pdf file.

Watch the following animation which gives a general idea of the high pressure full-cell process most commonly used in the primary preservative treatment of timber. Please be advised that this is a generalisation and does not discuss or imply any technical data or specifications.

HOW TO PLANT A POLE

If a treated pole is planted in the ground, it is essential that you allow for drainage of rainwater through the timber.  

STAND
If you plant the pole on concrete at the bottom of the hole, let the concrete set before planting the pole.

COLLAR
If you need to use concrete then let the concrete form a collar around the pole with the end of the pole protruding through the concrete.

CUP
Do not enclose the planted end of the pole in the concrete, as it restricts drainage through the pole.

As seen on:  SAWPA

SAWPA draws no distinction between the wood preserving properties of Creosote and CCA. Both are able to effectively protect wood from attack by fungi and insects. They are however very different in their form.

Creosote is a black oily substance whilst CCA is a water-borne treatment. A comparison of the important properties of each preservative is given below:

PROPERTY CREOSOTECCA
EfficacyFungi
Termites
Wood-borers
Marine borers
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Permanence
(Preservative losses)
Bleeding
Leaching
Evaporation
Fair
Slight
Slight
None
None
None
Penetration GoodGood
Effect on wood propertiesStrength
Dimensions
Flammability
Corrosiveness
Paintability
Gluability
Colour
Odour
Cleanliness
None
None
Slight
None
Poor
Poor
Dark
Strong
Oily
Slight
Slight
None 1
Slight 2
Good 3
Good 3
Light Green
None
Good
Toxicity HighHigh 4
Water Repellency GoodNone 5

1. Timber treated with CCA may be damaged by intensive veldfires as a result of its susceptibility to ‘afterglow.’
2. CCA-treated timber should be left for at least seven days after treatment before fixing metal fasteners or fittings.
3. Except where the preservative formulation contains a water-repellent system such as wax or waxy oil which may have a detrimental effect on the paintability and gluability of the treated timber.
4. Once it has completely reacted with the wood constituents, CCA-treated timber is completely safe to use and handle.
5. Water repellency may be introduced with the inclusion of a wax/oil additive.

As seen on:  SAWPA

As with most commercially grown timber, South African plantation grown pine and eucalyptus are not durable and are therefore subject to attack from fungus and termite. This is why it is necessary to ‘treat’ timber with wood preserving chemicals if you require confidence in its performance. Taking this a step further, SAWPA together with the SABS and representatives from the timber industry established the Hazard Classifications.

The purpose for which the timber is being purchased defines the treatment required. A piece of timber to be used in the roof need not be treated with the same amount of chemical as a piece of timber being used for a jetty. The treatment changes with different applications. The chemicals need not penetrate to the same depth, nor need the solution be the same. These two factors are called penetration and retention levels respectively.

The main chemicals used in this country are CCA (Copper Chrome Arsenate) and Creosote. CCA gives the timber a greenish look whilst Creosote leaves the timber pole dark brown to black. Other chemicals available are Boron and TBTNP (Tributyltin naphthenate – permethrin). TBTOL (Tributyltinoxide Lindane) and PCP has been removed from the market place because of its proven damaging environmental properties.

Chemicals should not be brushed on. The timber is put into a treatment vessel and through various processes, the chemicals are deeply impregnated into the timber, thus obtaining the correct penetration depth and chemical retention for the predetermined hazard class. Boron may, under specific conditions, also be applied by means of a dip-diffusion process.

In South Africa we have 6 hazard class levels of treatment.

H0-I INTERIOR
This is for interior uses only. Protection is only offered for prevention of certain commonly occurring insects and is a mild treatment process. All other hazard classes given below offer protection against insect and fungi attack. The products in this category are specifically for mouldings, ceilings, flooring boards and joinery.

H1
International trends set a H1 level. Because South Africa followed the international example when setting up its own Hazard classification, it was felt that H1 in the South African context would not be required, as this caters only for countries in which there are no termites.

H2 INTERNAL (LOW HAZARD)
This is also for interior use only and timber treated under this classification should be roof trusses, laminated beams, internally used structural timber, ceiling boards, flooring, paneling, doors, cupboards, skirting, window frames and plywood. Chemicals used here would be mainly CCA, TBTNP and Boron.

H3 EXTERIOR ABOVE GROUND (MODERATE HAZARD)
CCA and Creosote are mostly used for this and higher H class treatments. H3 covers balustrades, fencing bearers and slats, outdoor decking and beams, garden furniture, laminated beams, weather board, steps, cladding, stairs, log homes, gates, fascia boards and plywood. Spacers and cross arms used with electrical, distribution, telephone and light poles are treated to H3.

H4 GROUND CONTACT (HIGH HAZARD)
This level of treatment helps prevent agricultural posts and landscaping structures from rotting and termite attack. Also recommended for treatment in this hazard class are playground structures, fencing, pergolas, carports, flower boxes, decking, bridges and stakes, as well as electrical, distribution, telephone and lighting poles.

H5 FRESHWATER (HIGH HAZARD)
Timber which falls into this category, is timber exposed to continual wetting or where the timber is planted in wet soil. Timber which will fall into this category could be jetties, drains, walkways, retaining walls and slipways.

H6 MARINE (HIGH HAZARD)
Only the use of the CCA chemical with Creosote is recommended for this application. Only timber treated with both these chemicals will offer complete protection against marine borers. Jetties, slipways, retaining walls and walkways will fall under this section.

In South Africa all treatment plants producing treated timber are monitored through a compulsory third party product certification scheme. All treated timber is required to show not only the product certification mark of one of the approved certification bodies, but also to which H class the timber has been treated.

Your treated timber will be marked with one of the symbols listed below:

As seen on:  SAWPA